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lori r taylor, revmediamarketing, social media, social media marketing, branding, product branding, networking, oneclicksociety, social caffeine, mobile marketing

Were You Tweeting During The Oscars?

Chances are you or someone you know was posting comments on Facebook or status updates on Twitter before, during and after the Academy Awards ceremony last night. In fact, according to Bluefin Labs, the 84th Annual Academy Awards Show was the second highest rated televised event on social media ever, with 3.8 million conversations.

This is still far from the social media interaction seen during the Grammy Awards which were off the chart at more than 13 million conversations on the Social Web, but it’s a respectable number nonetheless, and another sign of the potency of social media when it comes to television.

But this is hardly the end of the story. I predict 2012 is going to be filled with similar stories as social media users begin to recognize the ways in which their interaction can influence what they watch on television, and the ways they interact WITH what they see on television. Sure, networks have been somewhat slow to accept that social media was not the enemy and that a properly managed social media campaign could actually boost ratings, but they’ve finally come around.

It is no leap of logic to see the benefits of social media on traditional television. In fact, I’ll go a step further and say it is no leap of logic to see the benefits of a well-managed social media marketing campaign on whatever it is you are doing. And the research proves it.

The ABC television network, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and advertisers stepped up their social media campaigns promoting the Oscars this year, in large part, to keep the TV ratings high. Their efforts appeared to have paid off with Nielsen’s estimates that more than 39 million viewers tuned in — an increase of 1.4 million people compared with last year’s show.

Comments on social media sites surrounding Sunday’s ceremony and red carpet arrivals surged nearly 300% over last year’s gala. In 2011, there were fewer than 1 million comments. The trend suggests that more people are turning to social media outlets while watching TV by using a “second screen” — a tablet, smartphone or laptop computer — to stay connected to their friends and followers who are also watching TV.

Bluefin Labs’ analysis found that the gender breakdown for the social media pundits was roughly in line with the composition of the TV audience. An estimated 57% of those who commented were women; men made up 43%.

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