The Hello Bar is a simple notification bar that engages users and communicates a call to action.

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Knowing the best times to reach your audience is one of the trickiest aspects of maintaining your brand’s social media strategy.

Compiled below are the best and worst times to post on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and Pinterest.

These stats are not set in stone – they’re based on Internet users as a whole, not on your specific target audience – but they’re a solid starting point for anyone looking to gain more traction with their social media posts.

The best thing you can do is keep track of your analytics – specifically, when your audience seems to be most receptive to your content – and periodically revise your social media schedule.

The Best and Worst Times to Post on Social Networks

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lori r taylor, revmediamarketing, social media, social media marketing, branding, product branding, networking, oneclicksociety, social caffeine, mobile marketingDownward Trending Interest Continues For G+

When Google+ launched last summer expectations were high-impossibly high. So when it didn’t initially catch on with users I was hardly surprised. However, here we are several months later and interest in Google+ continues to severely lag behind the social media leader, Facebook. In fact, anyone with a Google+ account will attest to the limited interest G+ users seem to have in just about anything.

It’s just not happening.

A recent report shows that G+ users spend about three minutes per month on the fledgling social media network, compared with an average eight hours of use for Facebook users. Ouch! That’s not a little behind, that’s a gap that makes the Grand Canyon look narrow.

Unfortunately, there are many good reasons for this lack of interest, starting with the way it looks. Plain. I said when it launched that although I like the simplicity of the Google search page I expected something a little bit more exciting from their social media network. It also doesn’t help that the site offers little when it comes to the ability of users to make their page unique, short of changing the five photos at the top of their page.

It also doesn’t help that Google+ offers little beyond what you can do with Facebook. Do they have Hangouts? Yes. Big deal. There are Facebook apps which will let you do similar things. Their Circles feature does little beyond what Facebook has always allowed users to do. Does your Google+ page integrate nicely with the other Google products you use? Yes. But not everyone is a fan of Google so this only goes so far to attract users.

And don’t get me started on their Google+ Biz Pages. They are not much more than static blog pages with room for comments. No apps, tabs or functionality.

Now, does all this mean I am anti-Google+? No. I have a Google+ account and run several for clients. Because of this I am in a good position to notice the deficits inherent in their design. What it doesn’t help do is figure out why, months after its release, Google+ still hasn’t at least matched what can be found on Facebook, much less surpassed it.

Perhaps now that people are sitting up, taking notice and avoiding the site, Google will finally do the same and give us something we just can’t find anywhere else.

Googles’ U.S. users averaged just 3.3 minutes on the site in January, down from the previous month and a fraction of the time Facebook’s members devoted to its service, according to research firm ComScore Inc.

The average amount of time spent on Google Inc.’s social network declined from 4.8 per minutes in December and 5.1 minutes in November, Reston, Virginia-based ComScore found. Facebook’s users, meanwhile, were on its site for about 7 1/2 hours in January, up from about seven in December.

Google unveiled the social-networking service last June, aiming to keep users on its site longer and boost ad revenue. The company said last month that Google+ had topped 90 million members, more than double the amount in October. Still, its user base is dwarfed by Facebook’s 845 million-plus members.

Click here to read more about use of Google+

social media marketing, blow upblogIf you want your blog to blow up (in a good way) stop sucking the life out it by being everything to everyone, having no clue who you are or why they care, and being the planless wonder.

How do I know? I’ve been there.

Most of the SMART people I know who struggle to be successful is because they are chasing too many bluebirds, hedging bets and don’t want to put their eggs into one basket. You’re so busy getting a plan B, you forget what plan A even is.

But you HAVE to find A basket. Something people can at least put on a shelf, even if they move you left to right.

Building off the big brains of some of the best bloggers out there – here are my top 3 most popular nuggets (links) this week about how to be a better blogger to build a real business. (You can do this!)

#1 You Don’t Love What You Do

Do you look forward to writing for you blog?

Are you constantly creating value for your people?

Is it just about the money or is it never about the money?

Who is listening?

Or more importantly, who isn’t…do you even know?

This is a great to the point article to fix everything that’s wrong with your blog’s business model, or lack thereof.

6 Fatal Symptoms You’re in the Wrong Niche a great guest post at Problogger from Martyn Chamberlin self coined “the two hour blogger” [I love that!]

#2 Be The Change You Want To See In Your World

Let’s face it your horn will always be honked louder when others toot it for you, right?

So keep this in mind and be the horn for your find the influencers who engage the most, who seem to have the biggest hearts and start GIVING to them.

Go to their blog, make thoughtful comments and ask provoking questions that supports their point. Talk to them at their Facebook page, Google+, even linked in.

If they have a YouTube channel subscribe, share their videos and TALK to them. Trust me, it will pay off if you add value. They are just as interested in a good conversation as you are, but you must pay your dues. Make them see the time invested with YOU is worth it.

This is just one tip from this great article  4 Ways to Get More People to Read Your Blog from Andy Nathyn at his blog or check him out on twitter @andynathyn

#3 If You Want More Subscribers, Just ASK (gasp)

If you’ve been marketing for more than 20 minutes, you’ll know or have heard it takes 7 touches to get a sale. This used to mean email, tv, print and direct mail.  But now, even doing a sequence of strategic tweets, a Facebook posts, comments at a blog, even search results count. No matter what your method, to optimize your efforts, you should make sure you ask more than once and in different ways.

So why in the world would you ask once, in the same place, every single time to “subscribe to my blog”?

It’s ok to quietly remind your readers at the end of your posts to sign up for your “newsletter”.  It’s even acceptable to plug it in a post. I’ve had friends test this and one marketer has a total of 16 asks on one blog page in various ways.  I bet you could only find seven of them unless you were looking.

5 Ways to Promote Your Blog’s Email Feed  via @JamieCrager

In summary, if you want to be a better blogger with a plan to actually monetize here are the 3 best blogs you can follow to do that…

Social Triggers http://socialtriggers.com

Viper Chill http://viperchill.com

Copyblogger http://copyblogger.com

Do as they say, and do what they DO.

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