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Social Media

This is a guest post by Mat Fidge of Nexus.

Video Marketing

Is video the future of content marketing?

It’s not an idle question: by 2017, Cisco predicts that video will account for more than two-thirds of all consumer internet traffic. Back in 2015 more than half of all companies are already making use of video and Nielsen research suggests that 64% of marketers can easily see video dominating their online strategies in the very near future.

It is the reach of video that makes it so compelling as a favoured content marketing medium. And what a reach it is: one in three in the UK watch a video online at least once a week, and YouTube famously commands over a billion unique visits each month.

But it’s not just reach that video offers. It is also highly sharable content, and, should your video go viral, you could be receiving 155 million views just like Volkswagen recently achieved.

People love to share videos. But how are videos being shared? Who is sharing them? And on what platforms?

It’s time to introduce the 80/20 rule of viral video marketing.

The team at Unruly have recently published new research that delves into what they call the “geography of sharing video ads”. The report itself makes fascinating reading but let’s just extrapolate some of its key findings.

  • Almost one in five online users share videos with their social networks more than once a week.
  • These ‘super sharers’, however, account for over 80% of all total shares.
  • Facebook is the preferred way to share videos (59%) with other platforms dividing the remainder amongst themselves: Twitter (13.8%), Google+ (9.3%), Tumblr (5.7%) and Pinterest (3.9%).
  • The speed of sharing has nearly doubled over the past year: 42% of shares occur in the first three days of online publication.
  • More than three-quarters of video views actually take place outside of YouTube.

What can you take away from this?

Firstly, you can tip your hat to YouTube’s importance but don’t let it blind your eyes to the fact that most video views are taking place on the wider web outside it.

Secondly, you need to know who the super sharers are in your niche, because once you have their attention you have a much better chance of receiving a high rate of shares.

Thirdly, you need to act fast to get your content trending because your window of opportunity is getting tighter and tighter.

And finally, if you are not engaging in video marketing you are missing a trick. Production costs have fallen significantly and platforms such as Twitter’s Vine, with its six-second maximum clip length, have opened the door wide to invite you in.

So, where’s that short, snappy storyboard treatment?

 

Mat Fidge watches and shares way too many videos when he should be working for Nexus Design and Print in Brighton (but it’s all part of the job).

Fired on Twitter

Back in 2013, a British teenager was appointed as the Youth Police and Crime Commissioner for her county’s police department. Seventeen year old Paris Brown’s job was to advise the police on policing teenagers.

It was a brand new role. Nothing had ever been done like it before, anywhere in the UK.

Paris beat over 160 applicants to the job. But when her appointment was announced, British tabloids started digging for dirt.

They didn’t have to look far. In the words of the tabloids, during her younger teenage years Paris had posted “foul-mouthed” tweets.

Within a week of being given the job, Paris resigned.

When she announced her resignation, Paris said:

I have fallen into the trap of behaving with bravado on social networking sites. I hope that this stands as a learning experience for many other young people.

All too many young people – and even adults – are unaware of the online footprint they leave behind when they post a tweet. Some even fail to realize that their tweets are public. (Several racists have discovered this to their peril).

This month, a teenager in Texas made a similar mistake.

Cella became a Twitter celebrity when she posted:

Ew, I start this f*** a** job tomorrow”

Her new job was at a pizza joint, working the cash register and taking phone orders. Unfortunately for Cella, her new boss at the pizzaria found out about the tweet after a staff member passed it on to him.

He logged into Twitter and posted a reply:

@Cellla_ And….no you don’t start that FA job today! I just fired you! Good luck with your no money, no job life!

Ouch!

Moral of the story: If you wouldn’t want your boss (or a future boss) to read it, don’t post it to Twitter. It’s not worth the risk.

Tweets are public – anyone can see them. That includes your momma. So if you wouldn’t say it on a stage, in public, don’t say it on Twitter.

Easy, right?

Have you ever said something on social media that you later regretted? What happened, and how did you fix the mistake?

Social Media Addict

Do you ever log onto to Twitter “for five minutes” only to find that two hours later, you’re still browsing your news feed?

Or do you find yourself constantly checking for Facebook updates on your smartphone?

Don’t panic – you’re not alone. Research shows that social media is incredibly addictive. One study has found that staying away from Twitter is harder than quitting smoking. Incredible, hey?

What Makes Social Media so Addictive?

The key to social media addiction is dopamine.

You’ve probably heard of dopamine as the pleasure hormone. This isn’t strictly true.

What dopamine actually does is encourage us to look for stuff.

As the folks at Team W explain:

From an evolutionary stand-point this is critical. The dopamine seeking system keeps us motivated to move through our world, learn, and survive. It’s not just about physical needs such as food, or sex, but also about abstract concepts. Dopamine makes us curious about ideas and fuels our searching for information.

Do you see where this is going? Dopamine makes us what to look for new stuff. Twitter and Facebook are veritable goldmines of new stuff. Your brain on Twitter is like Scrooge McDuck diving into his money vault. Everywhere you turn, your brain thinks happy days.

Well, almost. There’s one more trick that Twitter has up its sleeve, which makes it even more powerful: unpredictability. Sometimes you’ll go on Twitter and Facebook, and your mind is blown. Boom! Sometimes you’ll have a ton of notifications. Again, this sends a flood of dopamine to your brain.

Other times, it’s a slow day (or a slow five minutes). Nothing much interesting. No notifications.

This unpredictability stimulates dopamine.

And there’s one more thing… dopamine loves chasing down rabbit holes. If you have incomplete information (e.g. a 140 character tweet), you won’t feel satisfied. You’ll need more. So you’ll keep looking. Hence, you stay on Twitter for hours.

Here’s One Approach You Can Use to Break Social Media Addiction

Social media isn’t going away. For most of us, it’s integral to our lives – if not to our work, then at least to our social lives. And your brain isn’t going to stop producing dopamine anytime soon.

As the folks at Harvard Health explain, your best bet is to find other ways of making your brain happy, and fulfilling your desire for new things:

It is not enough to “just say no”—as the 1980s slogan suggested. Instead, you can protect (and heal) yourself from addiction by saying “yes” to other things. Cultivate diverse interests that provide meaning to your life.

That could mean:

  • Getting out into the real world and meeting new people.
  • Finding a job that’s meaningful and purposeful (that doesn’t necessarily mean quitting your current job – it can just mean subtle changes, or a new attitude)
  • Reading books – especially those outside your main field of interest.
  • Trying a new sport.
  • Cooking a different meal.

All these take more investment than checking social media, and so are more likely to give more long term rewards.

Over to You

What do you do to find meaning and purpose in life? If you’ve recovered from social media addiction, what helped you?

Let us know in the comments section, below.