The Hello Bar is a simple notification bar that engages users and communicates a call to action.

All

The Meyers& Briggs Personality Types are standards in most business and educational settings today. Understanding more about your self, your coworkers, and your clients can help you relate better, make smarter choices, and motivate yourself and others more effectively. It can also tell us a lot about how we do business- what we struggle with and where we excel.

If you’re not familiar with all the MB Types, here’s a quick refresher from the Meyers & Briggs Foundation and ThoughtCatalog (images courtesy of Intuity).

In General: Quiet, serious, earn success by thoroughness and dependability. Practical, matter-of-fact, realistic, and responsible. Decide logically what should be done and work toward it steadily, regardless of distractions. Take pleasure in making everything orderly and organized – their work, their home, their life. Value traditions and loyalty.

On Vacation: Schedules visits to every museum and historical site within a hundred mile radius.

At Work: Often works in management, administration, law enforcement, and accounting.

In General: Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Committed and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are important to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and harmonious envi

Finding the “secret sauce” for social media popularity is this century’s Holy Grail. Everyone wants it, few find it. But perhaps we’re looking at it the wrong way. Instead of looking for some cookie cutter formula we can mass replicate, maybe we should be looking at the psychology of what people actually do online. What really gets shared online, and why?

social media

Why Do We Use the Internet?

Using the Internet is a far different experience than it was in 1993. Back then, the Internet was vastly a place to get limited information. Now, you can do just about anything online, it’s like Vegas for media junkies. What happens here, stays here… forever.

There are basically two main reasons for going online: information and entertainment. You might pull up a webpage to find the store hours of your local home improvement store, or get a phone number for the nearest pharmacy. You may be researching the latest diet craze or that new medication your doctor prescribed.

The Internet helps you solve problems:

  • I need a good pair of running shoes.
  • How do I get my puppy to stop barking?
  • My computer is making a whirring noise.
  • Who’s running for president in 2016?
  • When is the next Game of Thrones episode airing?

These are problems that require information-based solutions. The Internet is a limitless resource for quickly garnering basic information about a problem. The best solutions to the biggest problems get shared the most online.

But the Internet isn’t just a tool for solving problems.

Enter the cats. Nearly every nook and cranny of the Internet is filled with cats, dogs, babies, people doing stupid yet funny stuff (-but mostly cats. Why? They got there first and claimed the best spots. It’s what cats do.).

And this (arguably) meaningless stuff gets shared like crazy. LOL CatZ do not solve any problems. They don’t tell you how to fix a stuck microwave carousel or why your right ribcage hurts after you eat a cheeseburger and milkshake from McDonald’s after the age of 40. But they do entertain us- and that’s where the magic happens.

You see, we’re media addicts. We carry around smart phones and tablets that are connected 24/7. We check our screens in the middle of the night and while we use the bathroom. We can’t eat a meal without a screen of some type glowing in our faces. The entertainment stream coming from our devices soothes our frazzled emotions and feeds our busy minds. The more we get, they more we want. So when something catches our attention, we share it with others, because we know they too are looking for a good entertainment fix.

Meeting the Need

Which of these two needs does your social media meet? Do you provide stellar information or star-quality entertainment? What gets shared online informs or entertains, or in the rare case, does both. And it does it well. If you want your media to be shared, you don’t need a secret formula, you just need to feed the beast.

Creating Shareable Media

Creating popular media isn’t rocket science.

Let’s face it, the strangest things tickle our fancies.

We like cute and funny things that distract us from our lives.

We have similar struggles and fears.

We have the same needs.

But not all great media goes viral. Why?

It doesn’t get seen by enough people and it’s “shareable hot streak” cools off when the next BIG THING comes along and replaces it. Its moment in the sun isn’t enough to microwave a leftover burrito.

Getting Seen Online

A few really phenomenal things go viral organically, like Charlie and his choppers:

But if you can’t get your kids to do something spontaneously adorable, and then find some way to monetize it, you’re going to need to promote your media.

Promoting your media is a lot like coordinating a well-planned military maneuver. You need to strike the masses with your information or entertainment and generate enough heat to not only nuke that burrito, but burn it to a nice golden brown. If you gain enough momentum, your media will snowball into a shareable tidbit that generates lots and lots of buzz and traffic, which translates into revenue for you if you’ve set up your website properly in advance.

So what are you sharing today? What’s caught your eye and prompted you to give it that highly coveted click?

Welcome to the final installment in our How-to discussion on SEO for Amazon Products. You can find the first two posts here, and here in case you missed them.

Last Saturday we ended up with a list or spreadsheet of keywords with high search volumes that are related to our Amazon product. But what the heck do I do with these phrases now? We analyze the data and put those phrases to work in our product listings.

Analyze Keywrods

Keyword Analysis

If you’re not the analytical type and just want to grab a few keywords as quickly as possible you can wing it. If you’ve only saved a few terms and are in a hurry, just click on the magnifying glass on the right and look through your keywords.(Google automatically saves your last plan, so you can come back to it or start over at any time.) Pick five or so and go with those. If they’re on the list and are relevant to your product, you’re good to go. Even the most rudimentary researched phrases are better than the ones you pull out of thin air.

If you want to use the power of Google’s tools to make a scientifically-backed selection of keyword phrases, you’ll need a few more minutes of analysis. Ideally, you’d want the highest search volume terms with the lowest “competition”. You can get this information from the spreadsheet if you download it. Click on the right on the little downward facing arrow and save the spreadsheet to your desktop.

Low competition keyword phrases are not being targeted by others in a PPC or AdWords campaign, and are less likely to be in use by your competitors.

Relevance to your product is the first and weightiest factor in determining your keyword phrases, search volume is next, then competition.

Other Tools

The Search Bar You can also pick one or two high search volume keywords that are relevant to your product, enter each one into Amazon’s product search and analyze what keywords the top results are using. Pick the ones you think are relevant to your product and include those in your title.

Google Instant & Google Trends You can also use Google Instant and Google Trends to find high volume keywords. If you have Google Instant turned on in your account settings, Google “predicts” what you’re typing, as you type it. Pay attention to what pops up in the instant search choices. These are usually the most used terms based on the one or two words you’ve already entered.

Google Trends shows you what’s hot in search terms right now. Just try out a few searches and see what you can find related to your product

WHY it Matters

Why go through all this trouble?

Because you, as the seller, do not think like you, the consumer. Let’s take a look.

For our iPhone cord example, our keywords that have the highest search volumes are:

  • iPhone lightning
  • lightning to USB
  • lightning USB
  • iPhone charger cable
  • apple iPhone charger
  • iPhone 5S cord
  • iPhone lightning cable

As a seller, I would describe my product as an “iPhone lightning charging cable” but there isn’t a high search volume for that keyword phrase. You see, it matters if you call it a charging cable, but consumers search for a charger cable, or even a cord. In our minds, these things are all the same, but Amazon’s search engine isn’t as intuitive as Google’s and it may not display the same results based on the wording used in the title or description. That’s why you see some product titles that are R E A L L Y long.

If you want to get your product in front of consumers who want to buy your product, you have to know how the majority of shoppers are searching for that product. Being “close” might get you on the tenth or twentieth page of results. Do you really want a buyer to see twenty pages of similar products sold by other sellers BEFORE they get to your product? Will they even make it to that twentieth page before they purchase an item?

Pick Your Poison

Once you’re armed with keyword phrases, pick out a few with high search volumes and use those in your product title. This will put your product in front of shoppers when they use those same words to search for a product.

You can also use a few in your product description, but don’t overdo it. ALWAYS, write for the shopper (people) first, and the search engines (computers) second. If your title and description reads like a list of ingredients or keyword stuffed nonsense, you’re going to discourage shoppers from making a purchase. You’ll be giving your product a cheap, spammy image and the shopper will buy from someone else.

What Not to Include in Your Amazon Product Listing

Pay Here

Amazon limits how many characters you can use in your product title and description, so we have to be a little bit picky about which words we choose. Our results from last week included title details like “8 Pin”. And while 8 pin is the technical description for the lightning cable, most consumers don’t know that. The lightning cable has eight tiny “pins” or connectors embedded in the hub of the cord, but have you ever taken the time to count them? An IT guy might call it an 8-pin cable, but do you want to limit your sales to IT guys?

In my case, the “8 Pin” description actually caused me to hesitate and be unsure if this product was actually what I was searching for- was it compatible with my phone? Confusing your customers doesn’t help close the sale. Save the technical details for the product description unless they are used by a the majority of consumers. Limit your product title to high-volume, relevant keyword phrases and unique features of the product (if you have room).

In the case of an iPhone lightning cable, buyers usually want to know length, color, and connection. Does it have a USB end? Does it plug into the wall, computer, or car? Is it pink so my boys won’t want to steal it (hehe!)? Is it at least four feet long to reach the corner of my desk where I keep my phone? This is where knowing your customer’s needs comes in handy.

Looking at the Big Picture

SEO isn’t going to miraculously create hundreds or thousands of sales for you on Amazon. The fact is, SEO is only going to get your product in front of shoppers. It won’t help you get people to put your product in their virtual shopping carts. You have to employ SEM and traditional marketing principals AND have a product people need or want. I can be selling the best darn lint balls on the planet, but if people don’t know they need or want them, they’re not going to buy. Good marketing is selling that same darn good lint ball as a firestarter for boy scouts, hikers, survivalists, and campers. Good SEM is advertising my lint balls on websites and forums were these people hang out, where they go to get advice about camping or share a bear-in-the-woods story. It’s running a PPC campaign targeting words like survival gear, emergency firestarters, and guaranteed fire starter.

It’s not enough to have an in-demand product in the world of online shopping. There are too many choices online. The chance of a shopper stumbling upon your product while browsing are slim to none. Don’t get lost in the search box shuffle. Use SEO and marketing to boost your Amazon sales.

 

 

Hey! Did you know the folks at REV Media Marketing do this stuff professionally? They’re web-savvy and up to date on marketing tactics that really work. Hire a pro if you feel like you’re like you’re in over your head with selling your products on Amazon. You won’t be disappointed. Call 513-334-0605 or drop an email at: info@revmediamarketing.com.