The Hello Bar is a simple notification bar that engages users and communicates a call to action.

Influencer Conversation

Twitter is the networker’s social network.

That means if you want to connect with influencers in your niche, it’s the place to go.

The only problem is, Twitter is also noisy. There’s a ton being said, which means if you want to get noticed, it’s tricky to stand out from the crowd.

The solution? Be a go-getter. Instead of waiting for people to come talk to you, reach out and talk to them.

It’s a bit like a cocktail party. If you stand in the corner waiting for conversation to come to you, you’ll probably spend the whole night as a wallflower. If you reach out and talk to people, you’ll have a good time. And you’ll help others have a good time, too.

On Twitter, the way to talk to people is to tag them with using @username. Recently, Twitter also added the option of tagging people in photos.

Just like starting a conversation, tagging people can feel a little scary. So here are five ways you can use tags without the need for nerves:

1. Drop Them a Note to Say Hi

This is the easiest way to get a conversation started. Just say hello! The person you’re tagging might well reply, in which case you’ve started a conversation. Awesome!

Even if you don’t hear back from them, you’ve identified yourself as someone who’s willing to engage in conversation. You’ve also put yourself on their radar, so the next time you talk to them, they’re more likely to respond.

2. Reply to One of Their Tweets

This one’s even easier than saying hi. Scroll through their recent tweets (don’t go too far back in time, or you’ll look like a creep), find one that’s interesting (or that asks a question), and hit reply. Easy peasy.

3. Share a Photo

If you’ve had the opportunity to meet them in person, be sure to get a photo together. Then you can upload it to Twitter and tag them. That’s a powerful way of reinforcing your relationship.

Even if you’ve not met them in person, you can use this strategy. Share the cover image of a book they’ve written, tag them in the image, and say what you enjoyed about the book.

4. Share Something They’ve Created

We’re all proud of the things we’ve created. So when you’ve found someone you want to connect with, go out and find a blog post they’ve written, a photo they’ve taken, or a video they’ve made.

Then share it. Remember to say thank you and what you enjoyed about it.

5. Write a Blog Post About Them

This strategy is the most powerful of all – which also means it’s the most time-consuming. I only recommend it if you’ve had success with the previous strategies. You want to at least be on their radar before you do this.

Here are some simple ideas for blog posts you could write:

  • Highlight an award they’ve won
  • Collect some of their most interesting quotes
  • Write a case study of something they’ve achieved

Your Turn

What strategies do you use to connect with influencers on Twitter? What have you found works best? Share in the comments below.

Pinterest Boards

We live in the age of the visual. Pictures are no longer 1,000 words. They’re replacing words entirely.

Even Twitter’s in on the visual game now.

What was the game changer? Pinterest. It’s the social network that’s all about finding and sharing great images.

Yet it isn’t only a place to procrastinate. There are boards on Pinterest that inform and inspire.

After all, information makes a lot more sense when it’s portrayed in a picture. And just a single image can be a huge inspiration.

So what are the boards you should follow, as a social media marketer? Here are 19 of our favorites…

Social Media Marketing World

Follow 007 Marketing’s board Social Media Marketing World on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 6,500

Created by: 007 Marketing

Curated by: Various

A pinboard of social media-related infographics put together by thought leaders in the field of social marketing.

See also: Social Media Insights, a pinboard by Jeff Bullas.

 

Facebook ‘Mega’ Tips & News

Follow Ching Ya’s board Facebook ‘Mega’ Tips & News on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 6,500

Created and Curated by: Ching Ya

Stay on top of your Facebook marketing with this collection of Facebook infographics and tips from freelance writer and social media enthusiast Ching Ya.

See also: Facebook Tips for Business, curated by Lorna Sixsmith.

Facebook Marketing

Follow Mari Smith’s board Facebook Marketing on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 6,000+

Created and Curated by: Mari Smith

Get favorite Facebook marketing tips and infographics from the queen of Facebook, Mari Smith.

See also: Mari has another brilliant pinboard of Social Media Infographics.  

Helpful Marketing Ebooks

Follow HubSpot’s board Helpful Marketing Ebooks on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 16,500

Created and Curated by: HubSpot

HubSpot publishes some of the best eBooks in the marketing world. And they’re free! Following this board is a simple way of keeping up with their latest publications.

See also: Templates and Tools – everything you need to put HubSpot’s advice into action.

So Pinteresting

Follow M2 Media Management / Social Media’s board So Pinteresting on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 3,500

Created and Curated by: M2 Media Management

Keep up to date on the latest Pinterest marketing advice by following this board from M2 Media Management. Recent pins include 5 Design Tools to create Pinnable Images, How to Add Vine Videos to Pinterest, and What Consumers Love and Hate About Brands on Pinterest.

See also: Pinning Tips, a board created and curated by Pinterest itself, and Pinterest for Business Marketing by Cynthia Sanchez.

 

Google+ Resources #EvanG+

Follow Peg Fitzpatrick’s board Google+ Resources #EvanG+ on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 4,500

Created by: Peg Fitzpatrick

Curated by: Various including Guy Kawasaki

What’s the difference between a Google Plus page, community, and profile? How can you test and refine your Google Plus strategy? Get answers to these questions – and much more – at this popular Google Plus pinboard.

See also: Google Plus Galore, curated by Jimmie Lanley.

Social Media Research, Data and Stats

Follow Beth Kanter’s board Social Media Research, Data, and Stats on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 5,000

Created and Curated by: Beth Kanter

When it comes to social media for nonprofits, Beth Kanter is your gal. This board that Beth has created will keep you updated on the latest research and trends in social media, and you don’t have to be a nonprofit to see its value.

See also: Marketing Fun Facts from Constant Contact.  

Content Rules

Follow C.C. Chapman’s board Content Rules on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 3,000

Created by: C. C. Chapman

Curated by: C. C. Chapman and Ann Handley

A board featuring content marketing tips and examples of brands doing great things with content marketing.

See also: Blogging, a board of blogging tips from Social Media Today.

Creative and Marketing Wisdom, Quotes and Sayings

Follow The Purple Agency’s board Creative and Marketing Wisdom, Quotes and Sayings on Pinterest.

Board Followers: 2,000+

Created and Curated by: The Purple Agency

Need to add some zest to your day? Then check out this board of quotes and sayings that are sure to get any marker fired up.

See also: Marketing Quotes to Inspire

Twitter Bio

You want followers on Twitter, right? You want people to talk and listen to you?

Presumably, everyone does. At least the 99% of us who haven’t locked our Twitter accounts. Otherwise, why else would you be on Twitter?

Yet all too often, people act like they’d rather scare everyone away than win followers. It’s like they plan their bios to be repellent.

Previously, we’ve looked at how to make your Twitter bio awesome here and here.

Now, let’s take a look at what you shouldn’t do on Twitter. What should you never include in your bio?

1. A Sales Pitch

Twitter is an excellent marketing tool. From time to time, you can even close sales on Twitter (though that’s not recommended).

But your bio should never be a sales pitch. Twitter is about marketing through building relationships. When someone reads your bio, they don’t even know you. You don’t have a relationship. So it’s a terrible time to sell.

When it comes to making sales, let your website do the heavy lifting. Twitter is about starting conversations and generating leads. So keep the selling out of it.

2. SHOUTING!

You know your netiquette, right? Using ALL CAPS online means you’re SHOUTING. I’m sorry, but whatever you’ve got to say about yourself, and however interesting it is to you, it’s not worth shouting.

If you’re going to yell at me before I’ve even gotten to know you, things aren’t looking good for the rest of our relationship. In fact, I think I’ll just walk away and find someone else to talk to…

3. Typos

Most of us spend 8 hours a day in front of a computer screen. Little wonder that we mess up every now and again.

Before you publish your Twitter bio, make sure you’ve checked it for spelling mistakes and typos. Your bio is your public face to the world. You never know who is going to read it and the opportunities you might miss because you were lazy in your proofreading.

4. Business Clichés

No one wants to know about your “blue sky thinking,” your “core competencies,” or how your work is “bleeding edge.”

There’s no need to hide behind corporate jargon. You’ve got a chance to express who you are. So do it!

It’s only 160 characters, so coming up with an original way to express yourself shouldn’t be too hard.

5. Web Links

Twitter gives you a space on your profile to link to your website. Use it!

Your bio is to tell us about you. So leave the links out.

6. Nothing At All

If there’s one thing that matters more than anything else, it’s having a bio to start with. Even if you make all the mistakes we’ve listed above, having a bio is always better than writing nothing.

That’s because without a bio, your profile doesn’t show up in Twitter search results. So nobody can find you.