The Hello Bar is a simple notification bar that engages users and communicates a call to action.

linkedin search

Looking for new opportunities? Maybe you want to find your dream job, discover what you’re capable of, or connect with people from your past who could help you out.

LinkedIn is a great place to do that, especially thanks to its advanced search tool.

In this article, we’ll look at the best ways to use LinkedIn’s advanced search tool to unlock your potential and discover hidden opportunities.

It’s easier than you imagined – and you can start right away. Let’s get to it!

You can use advanced search to:

Uncover Your Potential

Did you study an obscure subject, such as Viking Studies or Stained Glass? (Yes, these are real).

Or do you have some special skills you’re not sure how to use?

Then why not look up other people who are similar to you, and see what they’ve done with their lives?

Just enter your degree title, or your unusual skills into the keywords box, hit search, and see who comes up.

You’ll find fascinating people and get some great ideas for your career.

You could even add the people you discover as connections, then interview them more about their life journey.

Find Out How to Get Your Dream Job

Do you know exactly what you’d love to do, but you’re not sure how to get there?

Enter the job title of the job you’d love into advanced search, and look at the people who come up. You’ll be able to check out their profiles to see the path their careers followed.

This will give you ideas for what you need to do to achieve your dream.

Again, consider connecting with the people you discover to find out more about them.

Find Past Work Colleagues

Lost contact with people you used to work with? If you think they might be able to help you, then it’s worth getting in touch.

LinkedIn’s advanced search helps you do that, even if you can’t remember their names and even if they’ve left the company.

That’s because you can search both by company and by past company. Run a search for people connected with your past employer, and you’ll find your old colleagues.

Now that’s an easy way to make a reunion!

Over to You

Have you ever used LinkedIn’s advanced search tool? If so, what did you discover? If not, give it a try, and let us know what you find.

social media metrics

Both Twitter and Pinterest have recently launched analytics platforms to help businesses get the most out of their social marketing efforts.

Meanwhile, Facebook Insights have been available for three years (they’ve come on a long way in that time). And social media apps such as Hootsuite, Buffer and Klout all allow users to measure different aspects of their social media engagement.

As copywriters and marketers have known for over a century, stats are the best way of finding out what works, and what doesn’t.

But how can you make sure you’re making the most of your social metrics?

1. Know Where You’re Headed

For any journey, you need a map, a destination and a route.

Metrics are not the map. They don’t show you where to go. And they’re not the destination or the end goal. Rather, they help you see whether you’re taking the right path.

Before you set any goals for your social media engagement, you need to know where your business is headed. The goals you set for social media should then serve your business goals.

For example, let’s say you have a business goal of increasing revenue by 10%. To do this, you need to make more sales. And to make more sales, you need to increase traffic to your website. Boosting traffic is a goal social media can help with.

2. Get Familiar With What You Can Track on Social Media

What you can measure is usually dictated by the analytics tools you use. Some of the things you can track include:

  • Engagement. This is measured by tracking how many people reply to a post. On Facebook, these are comments and on Twitter they’re replies.
  • Volume. How much are your posts being spread? The more your updates are shared, the louder your volume. On Twitter, volume is created by retweets. On Facebook, the volume is amped up by “shares”.
  • Reach. This is the number of people who are seeing a particular post. Reach helps you put other stats into context. Getting 10 comments isn’t too impressive if you’ve got a reach of 1 million. However, 10 comments on a reach of 100 people is something to smile about.
  • Sales. How many sales are you making as a result of your social media posts? If you run an online store, Google Analytics can keep track of this for you.
  • Lead gen. If you run a service business, how many new leads are you generating each month as a result of social media? This is easy to track if you generate leads directly on social media though you’ll have to keep track of the stats for yourself.

This is just some of what it’s possible to track on social media. It’s worth getting familiar with several social analytics tools so you can see for yourself what it’s possible to measure.

3. Set Goals Based on What You Can Track and Where You’re Headed

Once you know what it’s possible to track, then you can set appropriate goals for your social media accounts.

Compare what you can track to your business goals. Which metrics are the best indicators of whether you’re achieving your business goals?

For example, if one of your business goals is to provide excellent customer service, then you might want to keep track of how long it takes you to reply to customer queries on social media.

If your aim is to boost the visibility of your brand, then you’ll need to track volume.

4. Make Your Goals SMART

SMART goals, as invented by Peter Drucker, one of the greatest business thinkers of the 20th century, are:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Actionable
  • Realistic
  • Time-bound

When it comes to tracking your social metrics, it’s particularly important to make your goals measurable. You’ve already done this by setting goals based on what you can track.

It’s also important that your goals are actionable. This means you know the specific actions you need to take to achieve those goals.

This is easier for some goals than for others. Taking the customer service example we outlined in the previous step, you might have set a goal of responding to customer queries on social media within two hours. Acting on that goal is simple. You’ve got to find a way of keeping track of customer queries, and you’ve got to make sure you reply to them.

However, if your goal is to increase the number of times your posts are shared, then the actions you should take are less obvious, so it’s not a SMART goal. You could adjust this goal to be “create three pieces of content with viral potential every week.”

5. Have a “Dashboard” Where You Can View Your Stats

Measuring your stats is only useful if you remember to check-in and see how things are going. You’re much more likely to do this if you keep all your stats in one location.

All good analytics software provides a “dashboard” with a stats overview. However, this is only useful if the dashboard tracks the stats that are relevant to your goals. You may find it more helpful to create your own “dashboard” by noting down metrics in a spreadsheet.

6. Tweak as Necessary

Social media is a rapidly changing landscape. A decade ago, Twitter and Pinterest didn’t even exist. Facebook was in its early infancy.

No matter what goals you set for your social marketing, you will have to adjust them. This could be because technology changes. Or it could be because you discover that your goals are close to impossible, or that your goals aren’t as aligned with your business objectives as they could be.

Adjusting your goals – and the actions you take to achieve those goals – isn’t a sign of weakness. It doesn’t mean you’re turning back. It means you’re responsive to feedback, and you’re moving forwards.

7. Keep Experimenting!

Social media is an experiment. No one has the monopoly on the right way to do it.

It’s a good idea to see your efforts in tracking metrics as experiments. That way, you can’t go wrong, because whatever you learn is feedback for your experiment.

And the great thing about experiments is that you never know when you’ll discover something no one has ever found before.

Market Research Social

Social media makes market research easier, cheaper and quicker than ever before.

If you’re not yet making the most of social media in your market research, here’s are four ideas for what you could be doing.

1. Check What People Are Saying About Your Competitors

This is a great strategy is you’re a small company looking to find your niche. Run a Twitter search for your big name competitors and see what their customers are saying.

You’ll find out:

  • What your competitors are doing right, and receiving praise for (so you can do this too!)
  • What they could be doing better. Noticing this creates your niche. Being great where others are falling short will make you stand out from the crowd.

2. Find Influencers in Your Niche

Part of market research is discovering the people who have the biggest influence over your potential customers.

Connect with these influencers, and they could soon be pointing customers your way.

To find influencers, you can use:

  • Twitter. Search for anything on Twitter, and you’ll be shown the “top tweets” related to your search term. These give some indication of who is likely to have the most influence.
  • Topsy. This is a social media search tool that makes it super easy to find Twitter influencers. Just type your industry into Topsy’s search bar, then click the “influencers” option in the side bar. You’ll immediately discover who you should be connecting with.
  • Klout is perfect for digging out the influencers in your current circle of friends.
  • Google Ripples will show you whose content is getting shared the most. Check out our tutorial on finding influencers with Google Ripples here.

3. Get an Ear for the “Voice” of your Customer

Have you ever met a musician who can hear a piece of music, then just play it? Annoying right?

Most musicians need to see a piece of music written down before they can play it. Then they need to practice.

Likewise with writing copy targeted at your customer. Some marketers have amazing instincts and can just do it (like those annoying piano players).

For the rest of us, it’s important to get to know our audience. We must find out how they speak – in the exact words and phrases they use – so we can craft copy that connects.

Social media gives you immediate access to the voice of your customers, at any time of day. So put it to good use!

4. Spread the Word about Your Market Research Polls

Not all market research can be done on social media. Sometimes you need to get an in-depth view of your customers.

Fortunately, this is easily done through polling. You can create a poll for free using tools such as SurveyMonkey or Google Docs.

Once you’ve created the poll, use social media to spread the word. You can ask your loyal follows to retweet the poll. Use relevant hashtags to make it spread as far as possible.

Your Call

How does your business use social media for market research? Let us know in the comments section, below.